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Talavera Cross
Talavera Cross
Talavera Cross
Talavera Cross
Talavera Cross

Talavera Cross

Regular price $18.00
Beautiful pendant cross made out of Talavera.

Made with authentic Talavera. Handcrafted in Puebla, Mexico. While pottery has been produced in Puebla since the 16th century, adopting techniques from Talavera de la Reina, Spain, early in its development the craft was influenced by the mestizo and creole sensibility. Talavera adorns the works of religious architecture and the facades of colonial houses, as well as the plates, vases and today has become a veritable symbol of Puebla. The factory, Talavera Armando retains its 16th century methods and traditional desing and colors, while also experimenting with more contemporary forms. Talavera, in Puebla, Mexico, is a type of maiolica pottery, which is distinguished by a white glaze. Authentic Talavera pottery only comes from the city of Puebla and the nearby communities of Atlixco, Cholula, and Tecali, because of the quality of the natural clay found there and the tradition of production which goes back to the century.Much of this pottery was decorated only in blue, but colors such as yellow, black, green, orange and mauve have also been used. Maiolica pottery was brought to Mexico by the Spanish in the first century of the colonial period. Production of this ceramic became highly developed in Puebla because of the availability of fine clays and the demand for tiles from the newly established churches and monasteries in the area. The industry had grown sufficient in the city that by the mid-17th century, standards and guilds had been established which further improved the quality, leading Puebla into what is called the ""golden age"" of Talavera pottery Formally, the tradition that developed there is called Talavera Poblana to distinguish it from the similarly named Talavera pottery of Spain. It is a mixture of Italian, Spanish and indigenous ceramic techniques.The tradition has struggled since the Mexican War of Independence in the early 19th century, when the number of workshops were reduced to less than eight in the state of Puebla. Later efforts by artists and collectors revived the craft somewhat in the early 20th century and there are now significant collections of Talavera pottery in Puebla, Mexico City and New York City. Further efforts to preserve and promote the craft have occurred in the late 20th century, with the introduction of new, decorative designs and the passage of the "Denominación de Origen de la Talavera" law to protect authentic, Talavera pieces made with the original, 16th-century methods.

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